How digital printers are misleading indie authors

Print on demand (“POD”) is the buzzword of the day, and many commercial printers are losing a chunk of their business to print on demand manufacturers such as CreateSpace and Ingram Spark (Lightning Source International). The result is a plethora of short-run digital printers doing their best to masquerade as true POD printers. A short-run digital printer will often advertise themselves as print on demand, claiming that their system is such because they can print one book or a thousand “on demand,” that is, without having to set up the Read More …

Image handling in ePubs reaches new level of inanity

Placing images into ePubs has always been an issue. At the heart of the problem is the myriad ways that device and app manufacturers have programmed image handling. While Amazon have remained consistent with their sensible shrink-to-fit approach, ePub device and app programmers have been all over the map. And it is only getting worse. So bad, in fact, that I stopped providing conversion services for clients with image-laden ebooks. It’s not that the work is impossible, only that the work involved to optimize and test everything is not worth Read More …

Recovering U.S. tax withheld at source

As a follow up to my previous post on the KDP/CreateSpace tax interview, I will now answer a question that often arises regarding one’s options for recovering U.S. tax withheld: Can I get any of it back, and if so, how? If you are a non-U.S. author who had tax withheld prior to sorting out your U.S. tax ID, you can apply to the IRS for recovery within three years of the date the tax return was originally due for the tax paid, plus any extensions you may be entitled Read More …

New tax rules for non-U.S. authors on KDP and CreateSpace

[UPDATE May 13, 2016: I’ve been receiving emails from authors who live in countries that do not have a tax treaty with the United States and who want to reduce the withholding tax on their royalties. This is not possible. If your country does not have a tax treaty with the U.S., then by default you forfeit 30% tax to the U.S. government on royalties earned on sales in the States. Your own country likely has a tax credit for taxes paid abroad; if so, you can claim your U.S. Read More …