Amazon close Write On. Will they go after Wattpad?

  Amazon announced today that, effective 22 March 2017, their online writing community website, Write On by Kindle, will cease operations. Authors are advised to download their work(s), and a warning has been posted on the site’s landing page. Write On was Amazon’s late-to-the-party entry into the online writing community. Earlier, and more successful communities include Scribd, which morphed into a paid subscription service, and Wattpad, with its 45,000,000+ global membership, and which funds itself through advertising (with nothing paid to authors, but that’s another story). The demise of Write On reminds Read More …

Amazon buys Goodreads. Will this devalue the site?

Yesterday, Goodreads announced it had been bought out by Amazon, a deal which goes into effect in the second quarter of this year. Many authors may remember the squabble last year when Amazon ended Goodreads’ practice of pulling data from the Amazon website to provide book information to Goodreads users; now, of course, it’s likely we’re going to see the exact opposite: only information from Amazon populating the Goodreads site. What will this mean for indie authors, and publishers in general? In my opinion this move devalues the Goodreads site Read More …

Is disintermediation possible for the indie author?

Following on the heels of my blog regarding Louis CK’s experiment with producing and selling his own video, the question arises as to whether this is possible for the indie author. “Disintermediation” is the new buzz word, and success stories such as CK’s suggest the only thing standing between the author and their audience is a blog and PayPal. But is it really? The allure of indie publishing is that it provides us with a way past the gatekeepers. But all gatekeepers? Or just the obvious ones? The only true Read More …

Baby Jane Finds Support in Independent Bookstores

In the excruciating slog through the treacle that has been the implementation of print distribution for my novel, Baby Jane, there has been one bright spot: four independent booksellers around my home near Vancouver have agreed to stock my book. While the likes of Amazon give me access to the huge U.S. market, and (eventually, or so I’m told) to Canadian markets outside of my home turf, having my local bookseller give my book a go is particularly satisfying. It says, more so than anything, “We support you.” And I Read More …