Finding Inspiration: Steven Kennard

Steven Kennard is a sculptor and wood turner based in Canning, Nova Scotia. His passion is boxes with intricate detailing that becomes all the more astounding when you consider some of his pieces are only a few inches high. He’s also worked collaboratively with other artists, most notably metal artist Elizabeth Goluch. There is something inherently mysterious about boxes, suggestive of hidden treasure, secrets, and all that is forbidden. A locked box is particularly intriguing: what is so valuable it needs to be secured, or so private it needs to Read More …

Writers under attack again

[UPDATE: the video originally posted and referenced here has been removed from YouTube.] The above video was posted on YouTube in the hope of stopping an educational exemption in the proposed new copyright bill. Whether or not the exemption is fair-dealing or the video fear-mongering (as some have suggested) isn’t, to me, the real issue; to me, this proposed exemption is just one more example of the myriad ways in which people seem to think that writers should work for free. Consider Ariana Huffington’s insistence that her contributors are happy Read More …

Backyard Tourist: Vancouver Maritime Museum

The first thing that strikes me about the Vancouver Maritime Museum is that it serves as an example to those who might wish to use our vast open waters for the purpose of smuggling: you’re more likely to be overlooked if you hide in plain sight. I’ve lived in this town for over fifteen years now and not once had I thought to venture into the pyramid-shaped building in Hadden Park, which, until this very moment, I erroneously thought was a part of neighbouring Vanier Park. See what I mean? Read More …

Finding Inspiration: Fran Forman

On my [previous] website I [had] a page of links to Artists Whose Work I Admire; however, search engines find blog posts more readily than content buried in a website, and so I’ve decided to use this space to highlight these wonderful artists whose works inspire me, bring me joy, and in some cases fill me with an unflattering jealousy. Case in point: collage artist Fran Forman. Years back, in my pre-digital days when I had my own darkroom, I had begun experimenting with photo collages, but sadly the experiments Read More …

Is big always better?

It’s not in dispute that today the trend in art is for large, often very large, canvases and prints intended to dominate a wall if not a whole space. It seems more and more we have moved away from art as an intimate exchange between the work and the viewer and into one of physical and emotional distance. Perhaps this is indicative of the trajectory of our culture overall: we have become increasingly isolated from each other, separated by technology that gives the illusion of connecting while keeping us apart. Read More …

Radicals safeguard the middle

In a discussion with a reader over a previous post, I was asked what I thought of a group of German feminists who claim heterosexual sex is oppressive to women. The question was stupid and off topic so I didn’t answer, but it got me thinking about radical social/political groups in general and if they serve any positive function in society. I have concluded that not only do they serve a positive function but that this function is essential. It is only through radicalism that we grow as a society. Read More …

What price life?

On The National this evening was a story out of Haiti about the new disabled population created by last year’s earthquake and the doctors who performed emergency surgery without consideration for long-term consequences. Whenever a major disaster hits, our first response is to save lives, and we applaud the medics who sweep in and provide care under the most dire circumstances. But as the doctor featured in The National segment, who revisited those whose lives he helped saved, believes now, if we’re not prepared to be there for the long Read More …

Why Helena Reckitt pissed me off

Just got in from attending a lecture at SFU, Forgotten Relations: Feminist Artists and Relational Aesthetics by internationally renowned curator Helena Reckitt, and boy am I pissed. I’ll explain in a minute, but to put it in perspective, first a bit about Reckitt. Reckitt holds a M.A. from Oxford University, has taught contemporary art history at Emory University, at York, and at the Atlanta College of Art; has written for various art publications; has worked at the Power Plant in Toronto, the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, and the Institute for Read More …

Debate is dead

Okay, maybe not dead but it’s certainly terminal, and what’s left of it appears to be languishing in a rarefied hospice somewhere, out of sight and mind of the masses. What passes for intellectual debate these days is often no more than a schoolyard scrap, with each side slinging barbs at the other while their mates stand behind them shouting out encouragement (think parliamentary Question Period and you’ll know what I mean). And even that’s only when someone actually bothers to engage an opposing opinion. Most, it seems, take a Read More …

The ambivalence of remembrance

I’m ambivalent about Remembrance Day. I believe it right and true to honour those who kept the machinations of psychopaths from invading our shores, as we did in both World Wars, but if we expand our view to look at war itself, the drums of honour quickly fall away with a sickening thud. Wars are never truly about freedom; they are about greed, about preserving and improving one’s standard of living at the expense of the loser, which is why even when we begin as defendant combatants we quickly turn Read More …